Detective Richard Milz and the Chicago Police Memorial

Detective Richard Milz and the Chicago Police Memorial

The Chicago Police Memorial Foundation is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to honoring the lives of our fallen heroes. The Foundation provides support and assistance to the families of Chicago police officers who are killed or catastrophically injured in the line of duty.

 

ABOUT THE CHICAGO POLICE MEMORIAL FOUNDATION

Established in 2004, the Foundation strengthens the relationship between the Chicago Police, its business and civic leaders and its citizenry. It allows us to express our gratitude to the fallen officers’ families for the ultimate sacrifice of their loved one.

 

REASONS FOR THE FOUNDATION

Since the first officer to die in the line of duty, there have been 567 Chicago police officers who have sacrificed their lives for our city. The families of these brave officers are supported by the Department and other organizations, but as one might imagine, the cost in terms of financial, emotional and psychological support is overwhelming. Other, perhaps less-known risks associated with being a police officer are the stresses of the job. This stress often leads to disastrous consequences such as when a police officer takes his own life. Finally, as a tribute to the heroic lives that these officers led, the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation has built a permanent memorial to these brave men and women. It is a spectacular site located just east of Soldier Field on Chicago’s lakefront.

 

WHY CONTRIBUTE TO THE FOUNDATION

By supporting these initiatives, our public-private partnership provides the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation with the means to achieve our goals. It is a sign to all the citizens of Chicago, as well as our nation, that Chicago’s corporate family and business leaders care about its police officers and their families. Your support is a reminder that when troubled times arise, we come together as families do, and provide comfort, support, and protection for one another.

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Detective Rich Milz says Join the 100 club fo Chicago!

Detective Rich Milz says Join the 100 club fo Chicago!

The 100 Club of Chicago is the civilian organization that provides for the families of police officers, firefighters and paramedics who have lost their lives in the line-of-duty. The Club helps families ease the financial burden associated with the tragic event, including immediate financial assistance and the ongoing cost of higher education. All federal, state, county and local police officers, firefighters and paramedics stationed in Cook County are included.

Chicago Police Officers get top honors for bravery

Chicago Police Officers get top honors for bravery

From Detective Richard Milz via the Chicago Sun Times:

When the phone rang at 10:30 p.m. on July 18, 2011, Jeff Friedlieb was afraid to pick it up for fear that something terrible had happened to his son, who had followed his dad into the Chicago Police Department.

“I was sitting at home and I got a call….He says, `Come to the County [Hospital]. I’ve got a bullet in my head,’ ” the elder Friedlieb recalled.

“Most parents would get that call and they’d be in the alley picking up his brains…You have to thank God when you take a bullet in the back of your head and have the audacity to fire back and shoot the guy.”

On Tuesday, the elder Jeff Friedlieb was in the City Council chambers to watch his son and namesake receive the Carter Harrison Award, this year’s highest honor for police bravery, along with his partner, Officer Ruben Del Valle.

Both plainclothes officers were shot while attempting to arrest a man they had observed allegedly engaging in a drug deal in a West Side alley.

During the struggle, the suspect allegedly pulled out a handgun and fired several shots. Del Valle was hit in the arm and head. Friedlieb was shot in the head. The bullet remains lodged behind his left ear.

Somehow, the wounded Friedlieb managed to return fire, striking the fleeing suspect. Charges were subsequently dropped against one suspect, but another is awaiting trial.

“I went down. Luckily, I was still conscious. I was able to fight back and wound the offender,” said the younger Friedlieb, who still suffers sometimes from severe headaches.

“It was pretty much will and training, dedication to the job….You don’t really think about the injury. You think more about catching the offender. Your adrenalin takes over…[Afterwards], you look at life differently. It is a second chance.”

The partners credited their military training with carrying them through on that fateful day.

“I realized my partner was shot. I was shot. The first thing on my mind was, `Okay, we’re still moving. We’re still able to get up on our feet and chase this guy.’ That will [to live] is just survival. Your body just takes over. You get that feeling of, `I’ve got to make it out of here. I’ve got to make it home,’ ” Del Valle said.

Nearly a half-dozen of the police officers honored during Tuesday’s ceremony had been shot by criminals they were trying to apprehend.

The elder Friedlieb, who was shot at, but never hit during 42 years on the streets of Chicago, couldn’t help but take notice.

“They’re getting bolder….It’s a lot harder for the officers today,” the father said.

The Lambert Tree Award, this year’s highest honor for fire bravery, went to Lieutenant/EMT John Majka and firefighter/paramedic Anthony Licato.

Together, they rescued a bedridden, 94-year-old woman from the second floor of a burning house on the Far South Side.

Despite intense heat and blinding smoke, Majka didn’t wait for water lines to be hooked up before beginning the search. He charged up the stairs, found the woman and was attempting to carry her out unconscious just as Licato arrived with a hose line to help him.

“I saw her ankle hanging off the bed right near the floor and just crawled up to her face. I could see she was burned. But she did take a breath, so that led me to believe she had a chance to survive. So, I kicked it into higher gear and got her out of there,” Majka recalled.

Pressed on what went through his mind on that day, Majka said, “You do have to choke down that uncertainty and that fear and push forward. It’s only human to do that. But that’s what we do.”

For Licato, being called a hero wasn’t easy. He said he would “much rather be at the firehouse.”

The best part of Tuesday’s ceremony was bringing his sons, ages 2 and 4, to the fire academy.

“They’re very excited to be here…They love the Fire Department. This was a big day for them,” he said, to the squeals of his delighted children.

Chicago Police Detective Richard Milz and the 100 Club

We mourn the loss of a dear friend, neighbor, former CPD detective, spokesman and supporter of the 100 Club of Chicago. Actor Dennis Farina passed away on July 22 at the age of 69. A police officer for 18 years and generous through and through, Dennis asked that donations be made to the 100 Club of Chicago in lieu of flowers. He will be greatly missed! To see one of his 100 Club spots visit:

What a class act! RIP.

Detective Richard Milz and what people will do for a cup of Joe! Video!

Detective Richard Milz and what people will do for a cup of Joe! Video!

Motorcyclist Saves Cup Left On SUV’s Back Bumper, Returns It To Driver (VIDEO)

Posted: 07/09/2013 12:16 pm EDT

 
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It’s happened to the best of us. You leave the house in a rush and inadvertently leave your cup atop your car or, in one woman’s case, the back bumper.

Fortunately for the SUV driver, a trailing motorcycle rider took it upon himself to return the coffee cup — while moving. In a video of the courtesy, a motorcyclist saves a cup from the woman’s rear bumper. He then speeds up to catch her attention so he can return the full coffee mug on the fly.

The motorcyclist’s act of kindness may be far from a typical roadside good deed — like stopping to help a pedestrian cross the street — but the driver likely appreciated the helping hand.

Richard Milz via All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten

“These are the things I learned (in Kindergarten):

1. Share everything.
2. Play fair.
3. Don’t hit people.
4. Put thngs back where you found them.
5. CLEAN UP YOUR OWN MESS.
6. Don’t take things that aren’t yours.
7. Say you’re SORRY when you HURT somebody.
8. Wash your hands before you eat.
9. Flush.
10. Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you.
11. Live a balanced life – learn some and drink some and draw some and paint some and sing and dance and play and work everyday some.
12.  Take a nap every afternoon.
13. When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands, and stick together.
14.  Be aware of wonder. Remember the little seed in the Stryrofoam cup: The roots go down and the plant goes up and nobody really knows how or why, but we are all like that.
15. Goldfish and hamster and white mice and even the little seed in the Styrofoam cup – they all die.  So do we.
16. And then remember the Dick-and-Jane books and the first workd you learned – the biggest word of all – LOOK.” 
―    Robert Fulghum,    All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten